art.br# 3_Poiesis in Praxis

Tunga and Lenora de Barros

OPENING RECEPTION: SUNDAY, JUNE 15 + PERFORMANCE 7PM

Realized by ICCo ( Institute of Contemporary Culture, São Paulo ),
in partnership with Pioneer Works & Clocktower

Tunga and Lenora de Barros – the two Brazilian artists chosen to take part in this edition of art.br#3 – have inherited similar Poiesis, though they belong to different Praxis. The dialogue between the productions of both artists is recurring in two main aspects: the constant presence of the performance acting as a way of expression as well as the influence of the poetry over their work. In this exhibition performance and poetry are directly related to Praxis and Poiesis, and each one of the artists explores the universe of these activities in a personal way.

Art.br#3 project brings to New York a selection of Brazilian contemporary production in performance and its dialogue with other languages. After two editions which have explored the encounter between performance and video and performance and music respectively, the third edition proposes the gathering between performance and poetry throughout the works of Tunga and Lenora de Barros. The works created by both are influenced by different Poiesis although they belong to a similar Praxis – performance and poetry.

Quimera, Medula and Cooking Destricted are Tunga’s videos selected to be presented in this exhibition. They were filmed using the poetical universe of the artist and employ recurring aspects of his works and installations. Its actors follow brief orientations and act freely without a defined script, just like in the performances.

Lenora’s performance is called Pregação, which in Portuguese means hammer as well as preach. It is also a junction of two words, “prego” (nail) and “ação” (action), the two main aspects of her noisy performance which will form and hide the word “silêncio” (silence). The remainings of the action, which happens on the opening, will be related to the video Calaboca(2006) also displayed at the exhibition, which also explores the “verbivocovisual” concept of the same word, using here a James Joyce’s expression.