Exhibitions



ON VIEW

“THE THE OLDEST LIVING THINGS
IN THE WORLD

AN EXHIBITION OF PHOTOGRAPHS BY RACHEL SUSSMAN
Curated by Christina Costello

OPENING RECEPTION: SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 13 2014, FROM 6-8PM
ON VIEW: September 13 – November 2

For the past decade, Brooklyn-based contemporary artist Rachel Sussman has been ​​​ researching, working with scientists, and traveling all over the world to photograph ​ ​continuously living organisms 2,000 years old and older. Her work spans disciplines, continents, and millennia: it’s part art and part science, has an innate environmentalism, and is underscored by an existential incursion into Deep Time. She’s captured everything from multi-millennial trees to 5,500-year-old moss to half-million-year-old bacteria, traveling from Antarctica to Greenland to the Mojave Desert to the Australian Outback. ​Her New York Times bestselling book ​of the same title was​ published in April 2014, with forewords by Hans Ulrich Obrist and scientist Carl Zimmer. Sussman​ is a TED speaker, a Guggenheim, NYFA and MacDowell Colony Fellow, and a member of Al Gore’s Climate Reality Leadership Corps. S​he was awarded the LACMA Lab Art​ + Tech grant to ​produce new work exploring Deep Time and deep space​ with SpaceX and NASA JPL. Her work can be found in university, museum, corporate, and private collections.

RS Logos Small
UPCOMING
bronx museum silver-1_FLAT THE LAST DAY
BOSCO SODI
OPENING RECEPTION: November 6
ON VIEW: November 6-16, 2014

Pioneer Works is pleased to present Bosco Sodi’s The Last Day, a site-specific 57 ft. long polyptych. Created with silver pigments and organic materials, the work questions the fast deterioration of our planet and the impermanence of life – one of the essential Buddhist doctrines: all of conditioned existence, without exception, is transient, in a constant state of flux.

Bosco Sodi (b. 1970, Mexico City) is known for his richly textured, vividly colored large-scale paintings. Sodi has discovered an emotive power within the essential crudeness of the materials that he uses to execute his paintings. Focusing on material exploration, the creative gesture, and the spiritual connection between the artist and his work, Sodi seeks to transcend conceptual barriers. Sodi leaves many of his paintings untitled, with the intention of removing any predisposition or connection beyond the work’s immediate existence. The work itself becomes a memory and a relic symbolic of the artist’s conversation with the raw material that brought the painting into creation. Sodi’s influences range from l’art informel, looking to artists such as Antoni Tàpies and Jean Dubuffet, to master colorists such as Willem de Kooning, Mark Rothko, and the bright hues of his native heritage.
Photo by Kevin Kunstadt